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There’s an old adage that “Saskatoon’s got nothing but hookers and hockey players,” but despite the place having a bleak reputation, there’s also a simmering underbelly of pure rock n’ roll party debauchery at a level that only people from backwater towns can understand.

Saskatoon is a Paradise.

I’m too old for this shit

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I don’t want to give anyone a lesson in how to sustain a green economy—I take 20-minute showers, after all—but when I visited Japan it struck me almost instantly that the culture has a serious packaging fetish.

Is this packaging issue about obsessive presentation, a Japanese tradition? If so, has it now become a problem, and how can it be solved? To get a more authoritative viewpoint on the subject, I spoke to Roy Larke, an expert on retailing, consumer behavior, and marketing who was previously based at Rikkyo University in Tokyo.

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London’s graffiti culture hasn’t always revolved around big bouncy graphics and Shoreditch street art tours. Forty years ago, in the wake of the 1968 Paris riots, London was engulfed by a wave of politically charged and poetic statements, scrawled on the corrugated iron fencing and dilapidated buildings of Notting Hill by members of the disillusioned post-war generation.

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There is no facile synthesis of the events that transpired at the Wamego missile silo between October 1 and November 4, 2000. The available information is a viscous solution of truths, half-lies, three-quarter truths, and outright lies, the fractionation of which yields no pure product. The dramatis personae are many and varied. The chemicals in question often obscure and untested. What is known is that in 1997, a virtuosic organic chemist named Leonard Pickard joined forces with Gordon Todd Skinner, the heir to a spring-manufacturing fortune, to organize what would later become the world’s most productive LSD laboratory. A laboratory that, according to some sources, produced 90 percent of the LSD in circulation, in addition to unknown quantities of MDMA, ALD-52, ergot wine, and quite possibly LSZ… but I’ll get to that later. 
Watch the rest: Getting High On Krystle

There is no facile synthesis of the events that transpired at the Wamego missile silo between October 1 and November 4, 2000. The available information is a viscous solution of truths, half-lies, three-quarter truths, and outright lies, the fractionation of which yields no pure product. The dramatis personae are many and varied. The chemicals in question often obscure and untested. What is known is that in 1997, a virtuosic organic chemist named Leonard Pickard joined forces with Gordon Todd Skinner, the heir to a spring-manufacturing fortune, to organize what would later become the world’s most productive LSD laboratory. A laboratory that, according to some sources, produced 90 percent of the LSD in circulation, in addition to unknown quantities of MDMA, ALD-52, ergot wine, and quite possibly LSZ… but I’ll get to that later. 

Watch the rest: Getting High On Krystle

(Source: vicecanada, via vicecanada)

 

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Maybe you’re still wondering why women would even want to sit around in some sweaty basement pretending to slay orcs. From a female perspective, what’s the deal with pretending you’re some gallant knight or evil sorceress? Katherine Cross, a sociologist and PhD student at CUNY who studies gender in role-playing, says that her D&D characters “were always the kind of characters that were lacking in major television shows—someone who was not reduced to her sexuality. For a lot of women, role-playing gives us an opportunity to author our own visions of power.”

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